© Designed by Dennis & Kayla White

THE HISTORY

The Green-Evans House was constructed in 1858 by Townsend Port Green, one of the wealthiest landowners in Moore County and Lincoln County. Green became rich from investments in a lumber bussiness initially based in West Virginia, that operated through several southern states which aided in construction of many plantation homes still standing today in Tennessee. The Green-Evans House is believed to be one of these homes. Green and his wife, Mary Ann Landiss, had fourteen children. Two of their sons died in combat during the Civil War.

In about 1885, the Green family sold the house and farm to Daniel S. Evans, a liquor retailer and saloon keeper who had lived in Lynchburg. Daniel and his wife Birdie had five children, his daughters were Mary Evans (later Mary Bobo, proprietor of Miss Mary Bobo’s Boarding House & Restaurant on Main Street) and Ophelia Evans (later Ophelia Motlow, wife to Lem Motlow, the nephew of Jack Daniel). Mr. Evans died at 39 and according to Mary Bobo’s memoirs, her mother continued running the farm with her siblings for many years.

Although the home belonged to many other families in between, the house was later purchased & renovated by the Hudgens family and registered with the National Register of Historic Places in 1992.